Poor old diesel drivers – their cars have got very complicated in recent years.

First there was a move towards sophistication and performance that matched that of their petrol counterparts. That persuaded many British motorists to go diesel. These new diesel drivers enjoyed consumption figures they had previously only dreamt of, at a time when fuel prices were rocketing.


However, the increased use of diesel led to concerns over the extra pollution they cause because of the soot they emit – which is associated with cancer and respiratory disease – and regulations were introduced in 2009 to ensure new cars were fitted with Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs). Different manufacturers fitted different types of filter, and some use an additive that needs topping up occasionally.

DPFs have not been without their problems, as they tend not to work so well on cars that are mostly used for short journeys and in heavy traffic. That can lead to clogged filters which need cleaning, through a process known as regeneration. As with most things on a car, DPF regeneration is likely to be cheaper if the problem is dealt with sooner rather than later.

DPFs also have a limited lifespan, and although that is usually a generous 100,000 miles (and many in practice exceed that), some of those fitted in 2009 are starting to need replacing. This is not a cheap process and until recently a popular approach was simply to remove the old filter. Unsurprisingly, the government didn’t like that and VOSA has now made clear that it is illegal and will lead to automatic MOT failure.

The best approach seems to be to keep your DPF going as long as possible – after all, many components far exceed their estimated lifespans if they are well maintained. If your DPF warning light comes on and stays on even after a drive down the motorway, get yourself to a garage and have it diagnosed before it’s too late.

More information on DPFs and the law is available from the AA, here:

http://www.theaa.com/motoring_advice/fuels-and-environment/diesel-particulate-filters.html

DPF services

Modern diesel vehicles are fitted with diesel particulate filters (DPFs), which filter out and then burn off the soot which diesels – but not petrol engines – emit. Due to concerns over the health effects of these particulates, DPFs were made mandatory on new diesel cars in 2009. More information on DPFs and the law is available from the AA, here:

http://www.theaa.com/motoring_advice/fuels-and-environment/diesel-particulate-filters.html

DPFs have not been without their problems, as they tend not to work so well on cars that are mostly used for short journeys and in heavy traffic. That can lead to clogged filters which need cleaning, through a process known as regeneration which we can carry out at EDINBURGH CAR SERVICES. As with most things on a car, DPF regeneration is likely to be cheaper if the problem is dealt with sooner rather than later. Different manufacturers fitted different types of filter, and some use an additive that needs topping up occasionally.

DPFs also have a limited lifespan, and although that is usually a generous 100,000 miles, some of those fitted in 2009 are starting to need replacing. The best approach seems to be to keep your DPF going as long as possible – after all, many components far exceed their estimated lifespans if they are well maintained.

At EDINBURGH CAR SERVICES we can help with all DPF associated problems, whatever the make and model of your car. If your DPF warning light is on, you should seek a diagnosis as soon as possible.

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